Sunday, 31 July 2011

"Red-Black - Pulsations in Space" - Mariana Cinteanu


“Pulsations” as visualisation of movements are paintings by Mariana Cinteanu which were created in an intense creating period lasting since 2006.

Without doubt due to their suggestive expression Pulsations represent a highlight of her oeuvre so far. The usage of the expression Pulsation is an attempt to describe the virtual visualisation of movements in the painting of Mariana Cinteanu.

Cinteanu owes her virtuoso application of graphical and pictorial means to her ego whereas her expressiveness is solely based on the impulsiveness of the alter ego. The painting first takes shape, if the alter ego as a powerful pulsating concordance completely pervades the artist and then emanates to the outside.

Using only two colours - Red and Black - completed by the white undercoat Mariana Cinteanu constantly creates new astonishing and stirring manifestations of movement.
In the pulsation of Red-Black Cinteanu successfully visualises the interaction of both fundamental movement patterns: the opening up expansion and the concentrating delimitation.

Beate Steigner-Kukatzki, "father of abstraction" and his children
   "The Rhine Palatinate -. NO 288" 11 December 2009
 Gabriele Hoffmann, "Red and Black. Art on Paper at
   Braun ", Stuttgarter Zeitung, Stuttgart, 2 March 2007
• Günter Baumann, "fine paper", March 2007
• Günter Baumann, "Red -. Pulsations in the Black Room", December 2006
 George strips, stutgarter newspaper, Stuttgart, 24 November '06
 Mathias Kübler, "E = mc2", passages, May 1994
• Andrea Kachelrieß, "Mariana Cinteanu," Art Bulletin,
   April 1994
• "Walk through the galleries," Gabriele Hoffmann, culture,
   Stuttgart, April 1994
 Nicole Fritz, "Mariana Cinteanu - The works on paper 93", Prince,
   Stuttgart, March 1994
• Petra Most Bacher, "Mariana Cinteanu" Lift, March 1994
 In Munich art guide, as Gatermann, Ed Keyser
   Munich 1992
• Dr. Ulrike Kiby, "Mariana Cinteanu - Portrait of an Artist", Nike,
   October 1992
 H. Graubner, "Seven at once," Stuttgarter Nachrichten,
• "Powerful color chords," Wiesbaden Tageblatt, 15.08.1991
• "Color with momentum," Wiesbaden Kurier, 19.07.1991
• C. Crüwell, "walk through the galleries," Frankfurter Allgemeine,
 H. Graubner, "Southern Impressions", Stuttgarter Nachrichten,

Tuesday, 14 June 2011

Layers of Time - The art of Laura Moriarty

 Plateau  2011  Encaustic on panel  8 x 8 x 7 in. Photo: Josephine Kenney

                               I was born in Beacon, New York in 1960. Pete Seeger lived there, (still does) and was very active, so I was influenced by the whole this-land-is-your-land movement. As a young person, I watched curiously from the sidelines as trippy hippies squatted in the abandoned casino on top of Mt. Beacon. There was a defunct trolly that used to bring tourists up there, with an old sign boasting the "Worlds' Steepest Incline!". I have lived all over the Hudson Valley, but for the past twenty years, the small town of Rosendale has been my home. It's an old mining town once renown for it's world-famous cement, and there are still mines and caves all over the town, more remnants of a bygone industry which feeds my imagination.

                                 My current work   aims  to create  a  glossary of  geologic processes - as if each piece were a diagram  from  a geology textbook, illustrating cross-sections of imagined terrains. These  paintings  are  built up  thickly around embedded sculptural elements.Then they are excavated and eroded down to reveal what was buried.  Like rockfaces or archaeological sites, their layers reveal the history of their making and can be read like the lines of a story.

                            I began painting with pigmented beeswax about 12 years ago and became interested in the range of things that can  happen by heating and cooling the wax. This process of heating and cooling has evolved into a way for me to draw parallels between human and geologic time. Rocks can tell the story of time if you know how to read their bands of strata. In my own comparatively smaller way, I consider painting similarly - using the process of making as a tool for discovery. In my work, process and concept merge as I consider the pure medium fodder for a re-visioning of natural history, where I get to make all the specimens in the museum.

Above paintings,  Centre left, " Caldera"  2010  Encaustic on shaped panel ,approx. 12 x 8 x 5.5 in. Photo: Richard Edelman,  Centre right, " Cover Collapse "(detail) 2011  Encaustic on panel  10 x 10 x 8 in.  Photo: Josephine Kenney. Bottom left: "Subduction into Trench " 2010 Encaustic on panel  10 x 10 x 10 in. Photo: Richard Edelman. Bottom right: "Area Excavation" 2010  Encaustic on panel  8 x 10 x 6 in. Photo: Richard Edelman

Pete Seeger, from Beacon, New York performs with Dar Williams, David Bernz and friends on"Solartopia!"- a song about the environment and supporting the use of green energy. 

The Way Paintings Go - Laura Moriarty

Laura Moriarty is an artist who works at the edge of painting and sculpture. Moriarty’s work has been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions, including Artspace, New Haven, Connecticut, The Samuel Dorsky Art Museum, Conrad-Wilde Gallery, Tucson, Arizona and The Albany International Airport Gallery. Moriarty has the distinction of having been honored with two Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grants, along with grants from the New York Foundation for the Arts and the Crafts Alliance of New York State.  She has participated in many guest lectures and residencies nationally and internationally.  Her works are included in the collections of the New York Public Library, The Progressive Art Collection, Cleveland, Ohio, the Flemish Ministry of Culture, Antwerp, Belgium, and theJyväskylä Art Museum Holvi, Finland. The artist lives and works in the Hudson Valley Region of New York.  

Wednesday, 25 May 2011

Eamon Reilly - "The Outsider"

Omagh   Acrylic on canvas     Eamon Reilly

                                      I go against the grain naturally. Someone once said 'When I find myself agreeing with the majority, it's time to pause and reflect'. Those words sum me up.  I find myself repeatedly, not even necessarily by choice, taking the side of the underdogs. I painted the above tribute to the victims of the Omagh bombing in Northern Ireland with the 31 white doves heading heavenwards from the burning ashes of the bomb's aftermath.This is one of many anti-war paintings I have completed. Being anti-war must mean anti-terrorist also and I cannot condone any murder or killing for any cause. Gandhi and Martin Luther King are therefore two of my heroes. I feel very strongly about certain things in the world and I believe that is what drives me to paint. For instance, the atrocities of 9/11 inspired me to paint 'Celebrate New York, Your Spirit Will Never Die'. The resilience of the people of New York at this time and afterwards was quite remarkable.
                                        Injustice makes me paint also. Last year the Irish Prime Minister/Taoiseach Brian Cowen was getting bad press during the IMF bailout and I thought this was most unfair. There was a painting that ridiculed him in a Dublin gallery and there was plenty of publicity around this especially in the national television news coverage. Challenging the status quo, it inspired me to do a portrait of him looking dignified in front of the Irish tricolour. I have also challenged the extent to which the Catholic Church in Ireland have been portrayed in the wake of the terrible child abuse cases both by the media and internet. Balancing the scales, this picture is not the church I have known and am still part of. Painting all catholics and church leaders with the same brush inspired me to respond by producing several religious portraits including that of Padre Pio and Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta. I used an inner frame painted in the style of stain glass to pay homage to their greatness and portray them in a contemporary way. 
 Celebrate New York,Your Spirit Will Never Die
 Brian Cowan

 'Witty, thought-provoking, stylistic and vibrant, Reilly's art is contemporary in style and shows a true talent and flair for expression through the medium of paint....The works are neither traditional  or abstract.... nor purely figurative...the artist gives subjects... a sort of Eamon Reilly treatment that helps them be instantly recognisable as his work'
Sinead Hogan The Anglo Celt        

 Eamon Reilly is a self taught artist living in the picturesque little village of Finea in County Westmeath, Ireland. His work has been described as folk, naive and more significantly as "outsider art". He has paintings in collections in Ireland,United Kingdom and United States. He has been working for the past six years in his studio which also houses a small gallery. Influenced by Van Gogh, Picasso, Munch and Chagal,he has developed an individual style which honours his title as "The Outsider".